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College Currencies

College Currencies

    An incoming freshman once asked me for some college advice…

 

Change is the reason I get out of bed every morning. I have come here to Andrews University because I want to make a change here, a change in myself, and a change in my opportunities. As a high school student, I did not clearly understand what I would need to change. Most of what my thoughts concerned starting every school day with my best to eventually enter a university, start working, and have stable finances. It sounded as easy to do as it was to say, especially since we had a lot of time between then and those landmarks we set for ourselves. Now that we are in college, the times of becoming an independent productive member of the community are approaching. I have had to grow up a lot here in college and make changes in my life—we all have. With so many more responsibilities, whether we choose to pay attention to them or not, it becomes increasingly more apparent that our existence, especially in the academic field, is founded on an exchange of time.

 

We each have an equal amount of allotted time, we all run on the same 24-hour clock. Some of us have more time available to spend and others are sprinting and rushing between obligations, projects, and goals. In an economy of time, we have to bargain and deal our way to gain more. I may ask a friend to grab me something on his stop to the Gazebo because the amount of precious time wasted waiting in line and for my food could be used for studying.

 

However, this new economy is not simply a collegiate phenomenon. For the rest of our lives, the funds carrying us through this experience are the product of someone slaving away their hours in an energy plant, in a textile manufactory, in an Iowan corn field. That time becomes time our professors take to lecture and have open office hours. It compensates for the time manufacturers take to produce the supplies we use. We standardize the value of this time through pay per hour and cost of materials. However, there is a relative value to each of us. In scenarios where our time is especially limited, every hour becomes more valuable. Here’s where my advice came in:

“Once your pockets are emptied by the cost of your education, the new main currency becomes time. Guard it carefully.”

 

Since seconds are your new pennies, consider every moment as an investment. You are here, in an environment of amplified opportunities to invest at a high cost. Any sensible being would realize that this is not a time to act as we once were, impulsive children of habit! Sacrifices are to be made to stave off regret. Are we here to enjoy less lag? Are we here to enjoy the privacy our own dorms give us? Enjoy the clubs and social events? Take advantage of work/research opportunities? Maybe gain some of those dollars back along with an addition to our resume? Whatever it is you do, remember that you are paying in limited amount of precious minutes bought with dollars. Act deliberately.

 

Yet Another Co-Curricular Article

Interview with Judi Dougan

Interview with Judi Dougan