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Freshman Spotlight: Ben Lee

Freshman Spotlight: Ben Lee

Name: Ben Lee
Class Standing: Freshman,
Major: Political Science, Pre Law
Interviewed by Adriana Santana

 

 

Originally you were an engineering major. What made you switch to political science?
Partly it was my love for people. Engineering is a great career, great field and there are great people in that major, but it’s not as social as others. A person doesn’t necessarily have to work with people at all; you could be doing stuff by yourself and not interact with people. For me that would be pretty bad because I need people, so I decided on something that is more people-oriented. I can also advocate for people, and with being a lawyer you’ll have people come to you to talk to you about their cases and what they’re going through.

 

 

So what type of lawyer do you want to be?
I get that question a lot, but right now,  I’m looking at civil law, immigration and corporate law.

 

 

Which one do you see yourself leaning more towards and why?
Well I can’t really pick one, there are so many, but for right now I really like the idea of working in immigration law. Especially since a lot of my friends are from the Caribbean or South American countries, I’ve heard stories about how their families have had immigration lawyers who became a part of their family because of their hard and intimate work; it became such a strong relationship and bond that changed their life. In fact, the reason why they’re in college now is because their immigration lawyer was able to bring them here.

 

 

Do you feel like you’re leaning towards that even more because of the Immigration Ban happening in our nation?
Yes, definitely. Also I believe immigration is a very personal branch because my grandparents were immigrants. They came through Ellis Island, and having that history makes me want to help people like that because their descendants could be people like me.

 

 

As a political science major, do you think politics is a touchy subject in the Seventh-day Adventist community?
I can see how it is, because a lot of people like to stay politically neutral and they feel like that’s their duty to not pick a side. I feel like as Christians sometimes there is no fence when it comes to God and Satan. So with some political issues there is no fence; for you to be on the fence is to be on a side, as someone owns the fence. Obviously we all interpret the Bible differently, but don’t be afraid of political issues; let your Christian beliefs lead your political beliefs.

 

 

Now let’s take it back to #ItIsTimeAU. You were one of the nine students in that video. Do you feel like by being a part of that video you’re making an impact on this campus?
I do. I definitely see in these weeks after the video how it’s been taken and I am really glad to see how receptive people have been in not only the Andrews community, but in other Adventist colleges as well. They’ve also started initiatives to fix the problems they have in their own schools, so I definitely see how it had an impact and I’m glad that it did.

 

 

 

Do you feel like you’re going to continue making strides and impact this campus in different ways?
I would hope so. Maybe not in the same gravity that the video did cause it was kind of earth-shaking, but definitely in small ways. Everyone should, every student should strive to affect their community and not just to be in it but to be a part of it.

 

 

What do you see yourself doing during your next four years at Andrews?
Well, hopefully I get good grades. I want to travel a lot, meet a lot of people and learn everything that I can.

 

 

Are there any groups on campus that you see yourself a part of more, and be a champion of change with them?
I would definitely want to be a part of AUSA. I think it’s important because AUSA is the most direct voice for students to the administration, and even higher up to the board. So it’s important that we take our opportunities to work there and to use our voice.

 

 

So since you made that jump from engineering to political science, what advice would you give to someone who is thinking of changing his or her major?
First off, pray about it. I prayed for a really long time. Second, talk to people, find people who are in that major who are graduating or have graduated the department, and find as much information as you can. Third, do it soon. I know one of the benefits for me is that since I’m a freshmen I have a lot of time, but obviously if you want to graduate in four years you want to make that decision soon.

 

 

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