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Love is in the Air: Faculty Couples

Love is in the Air: Faculty Couples

One of the unique aspects of attending small universities like Andrews University is the abundance of faculty couples that work together. We asked some of Andrews’ faculty lovebirds to share some of their thoughts on love and marriage.

 

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David Randall (Professor of Chemistry) & Lisa Ahlberg (Associate Professor of Chemistry)

 

How did you two know you were in love?
DR: Well, I thought about her a lot. It was hard to realize how I felt but my friends helped me recognize my feelings. They were conflicted at first, but after explaining it to my friends I was able to come to a conclusion.

LA: I knew when I started to worry about him and was concerned if he was paying attention to me or not.

How do you keep the spark going?
DR: I stay committed to the relationship as a separate thing. As humans, one always gets frustrated with the other but we just continue to work on our relationship. We also do many things together. We also have our regular activates that we do, for example, we would go on dates to Meijer. We also reflect on our past experiences.

LA: We just stay very conscientious. We constantly plan to do things together.

 

 

 

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Asta LaBianca (Assistant Professor of English) and Oystein LaBianca (Associate Director, Institute of Archaeology, Professor of Anthropology)

 

How do you keep the spark going?
AL: It took me a while to be sure and convinced. From when we first met to when we got married was only nine months; there was a lot about him that I admired. I knew he going to be very positive and a life partner. I was dating someone else at the time, and even though he was a great guy there was a lot more that my husband had to offer. It was more of an intellectual thing for me than immediate infatuation.

How do you keep the spark going?
AL: We try to do lots of things together on a regular basis. He brings me flowers now and then, we go out to dinner, we take walks almost every day and I think that is very positive for our relationship. When he is gone we try to keep contact every day. Making an effort matters the most.

 

 

 

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Meredith Jones-Gray (Professor of English) and Gary Gray (Assistant Professor of English)

 

How did you know you were in love?
MJG: We knew we were in love when we wanted to spend all our time with each other. Or the real moment: when we started sharing food at restaurants!

How do you keep the spark going?
GG:  We still have the most fun doing things together—browsing bookstores, watching baseball, antiquing. And we still share dessert at restaurants!

 

 

 

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Susan Zork (Assistant Professor of Religion) and Stephen Zork (Professor of Music, Conductor of University Singers)

 

How did you know you were in love?
Susan: “Knowing” you’re in love is a pretty interesting and subjective idea. But other than the obvious, natural attractions (which should never be discounted), I just really liked Stephen. He was the person I would always prefer to be with. I liked him more than anyone else I had ever met; my first choice of a friend; someone to eat with, spend time with, be close to. When you figure out that you’re the happiest, the most content, the most at ease, the most stimulated and challenged by, and the most honest and vulnerable with; the one person you never fail to enjoy and always want to be close to you, and when he holds your hand something in your chest feels so strong it almost hurts;   well, then I think that’s when you can safely know you’re in love. That’s the way I felt when I first got to know Stephen and it hasn’t changed one bit in 42 years.   

How do you keep the spark going?
Susan: “Spark” advice—see above—stay close, do things together, hold hands, be honest, talk, play; make time, make love—all the things you did when you were young and in love—it doesn’t have to change and it shouldn’t.

Where are We Now?

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