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Women’s March on Chicago

Women’s March on Chicago

    In a place like Berrien Springs in more-or-less rural Michigan, where Trump/Pence signs have stood in one yard after another and have lined roads for months, this election cycle has felt incredibly isolating. No matter how many friends I’ve surrounded myself with who share similar viewpoints, as state after state blinked to red on election night and a man whose rhetoric is grounded in fear and hatred was chosen to be president, that feeling of separation increased. However, on Saturday morning, as we looked out over Chicago’s Michigan Avenue completely filled with a sea of protesters, an overwhelming sense of peace washed over me—here were 250,000 people who care.

As my friend Jonathan Doram (senior, music education), who marched on Saturday with me, stated, “I marched because women’s rights are human rights and human rights are women’s rights. I marched because I want to manifest that belief in myself, our campus, our country and our world.”

In Chicago, we marched for human rights for marginalized communities, women, persons of color, immigrants, Muslims, and the LGBTQ+ community along with showing support for public education, Planned Parenthood and awareness of climate change.

My friend Alexis Thomas (junior, family studies), another marcher, said, “In the midst of everything going on I felt a part of something bigger…amongst the marchers all coming together for one common cause. Equality.”

Trump’s administration stands as a direct threat to the people and issues supported by the Women’s March. However, politics does not just happen in Washington, D.C. Laws are meaningless if they cannot be enforced. If Saturday’s international show of solidarity is any indication, it is clear that we will not stand by quietly for four years and allow progress to be reversed.  

 

Women’s March on South Bend

Women’s March on South Bend

Washington’s Political Transition