Sections


Authors

Artistically Speaking

Artistically Speaking

    In the press of the school year we sometimes forget that Andrews has incredible artistic vibrancy. We attend classes with painters and poets, regularly experience live music in churches and concerts and trade ideas about popular art and entertainment every day with our peers. In the collegiate environment we are often so saturated in culture, not to mention stress from school, work, and the other minutiae of life, that we become numb to the talent and opportunities that surround us. In the coming year the Arts and Entertainment section will have a triune focus: celebration of student art and artists, examination and enjoyment of commonplace art, and approaching canonized art.
    For a comparatively small campus, Andrews has a high concentration of artists. The people around you are learning instruments, singing in choirs, painting portraits, creating sculptures, reciting poetry and writing novels. They have pottery clay under their fingernails and calluses on their hands from playing guitar. So often when we think of art we think of impossibly high standards and far-away places, and we overlook on-campus exhibitions and concerts at the Howard Performing Arts Center. This year, the Arts and Entertainment section wants to give recognition and attention to the artists among us.
    College students are often caught saying things like, “I didn’t do anything this weekend, I just stayed in and binged on a TV show.” The Arts and Entertainment section wants to emphatically affirm “That’s not nothing.” Entertainment is important. Popular shows, movies, books and music are art! They are emotionally and intellectually-effecting purposeful applications of artistic talents and creativity. They are worthy of examination and enthusiasm. Just because something is commonplace doesn’t mean that it is shallow. Approach art and entertainment with an inquisitive and analytical mind, see what’s good, find what’s bad and talk about it.
    While accepting entertainment and popular art as “real art” we must also take another look at what has traditionally been considered “real art”. These canonized works, such as the music of Beethoven, the plays of Shakespeare, and the paintings of Michelangelo can often be intimidating or inaccessible. It is my hope that we will discuss these important pieces with an unpretentious interest that welcomes people of all backgrounds to discuss and interact with art that can seem daunting. Art of all kinds can be approachable, and in the Arts and Entertainment section we aim to present classic works with a fresh eye and open mind.
    When we become overwhelmed by the unending tide of work and stress we tend to forget art, neglecting to create or ingest art in a meaningful way. This is especially unfortunate as it is at times like these that we may need art the most. So as we progress through another tumultuous year, undoubtedly filled with personal, political and societal change, take time to embrace art by supporting the artists around you, ingesting commonplace art with intentionality and opening your horizons to art that has already received recognition for its message and skillful design. The Arts and Entertainment section will be here to help.

Smart

Smart

Tea Time with President Luxton

Tea Time with President Luxton