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Without a Paddle

Without a Paddle

    Here at Andrews, we enjoy an international campus. People from all over the world share our academic and spiritual community; they also share our current political climate. Though they may be entirely aware of this election and the outcome of it could potentially affect them in a number of ways, the responsibility of voting in this election does not fall to them. This in no way means that they are not intently watching the proceedings.

    Paul Roschman, from Hamilton Ontario, Canada is a sophomore studying anthropological archaeology. Though his interest for politics was not truly ignited before he joined us here at Andrews, he now expresses an interest in American politics. He says that Canadians find American politics quite interesting as they differ from the politics at home. In Canada, there are only six weeks of elections whereas here in the United States we have basically a year and a half of campaigning before election season begins.

    Roschman recognizes that there is no such thing as an unbiased news source, so he gets his news from a variety of outlets. “I tend to go across the board, Google news, CBC, CNN, I’ll look at Fox, NBC.” This way he sees stories from different points of view and can determine his own stance for himself. He checks up on the election a couple times a day through a news app, noting that it is almost unavoidable with how the Internet is practically dominated by election news.

    Though many people are invested in this election and believe that a particular candidate would negatively affect their life, he doesn’t know anyone who is particularly enthusiastic about either main candidate. When asked how this election might affect him personally, Roschman said, “For example, if Hillary does win and institute a $15 minimum wage, I would make a lot more money, which is great. On the flip side, if Trump wins, I’m not quite sure how foreign policy relations and economic reform and social justice will all pan out.”

Though he may not entirely agree with Clinton’s “ethics,” Roschman says that if the responsibility of voting were to fall to him, he would vote for Clinton: “I don’t doubt that she is qualified and competent to be president; the same cannot be said for Trump.” Roschman does not believe that whoever is elected on Nov. 8 will be a two-term president, since each has unparalleled negative ratings.

Paul Roschman is not alone on this campus; there are many other international students with us that are watching this election with particular interest. How we as a community react is being watched as well. What we defend and what we tolerate is being noted. For those of us on campus who are able to vote this Election Day, I urge you to do so. Use your ballot and make your voice known.

 

Dorm Décor

Dorm Décor

When Was America Great?

When Was America Great?