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Wind Symphony’s First Fanfare

    On Sunday, Oct. 23, the University Wind Symphony performed their very first concert of the semester. And, wow, do they know how to have a first concert. During their rehearsal, I could tell that these players enjoyed their music, and so I decided to interview a few of them about why they enjoy playing their instruments.
    Ana Lozano (Master of Music, Piano Performance) commented that she loved playing the French horn because it creates ‘’such a cool sound, while not being as annoying as a trumpet.’’
    Stacey DePluzer (senior, health sciences) said, ‘’I like playing the flute because it sounds great. It has such a pretty and lively feel.’’
    Knowing that these musicians really cared about their playing made me very excited to hear them perform.
    At the concert, the University Wind Symphony’s first piece, Jack Stamp’s “Gavorkna Fanfare” set the mood for the entire night: chaotic and building up to something. While only this first piece included the word fanfare in the title, any of the pieces following could have had that same name. Perhaps director Alan Mitchell planned it this way, but in every single piece there was a point that felt like a fanfare. It was a very big sound almost consistently, and the symphony decided to show it off on every beat.
    Additionally, almost every single performer was, at some point, swaying to the beat of the music. While the pieces were serious, the swaying that occurred made them seem less threatening and more genuine, which just instilled how much this symphony loved what they were doing.
    While the symphony’s second piece, Felix Mendelssohn’s “Overture for Band” was a weaker piece, the concert was revived in the third piece, ‘’Concerto in B Flat for Two Trumpets’’ by Antonio Vivaldi, with the arrival of two guest trumpet soloists. These soloists really brought out yet another fanfare. They were honestly majestic. The symphony played one more song after that, which again, was leading up to something, and then went to intermission. And that is where the chaotic nature of everything came into play.
    At first, Ron Nelson’s ‘’Resonances’’ made me feel uncomfortable. The brass players were given a chart of notes that they could play at whatever speed and however many times they wanted, while the woodwinds were up on stage “ooh-ing.” Eventually, however, the percussion came in, led by percussion head Zaveon Waiters (sophomore, music). It was a marvelous effect.
    The concert wrapped up with a few more lively pieces, including an encore performance of ‘’The Washington Post’’ by John Philip Sousa. From one fanfare to the next, this concert was a pretty big hit for the Wind Symphony’s first concert of the year.

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