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Reggae Night Revives and Celebrates Caribbean Culture

    On Oct.15, Reggae Night kicked off the return of the Andrews University Caribbean Club. Students were invited to come out to the Forsyth Honors House on Saturday night to join the Caribbean Club in celebrating a particular aspect Caribbean culture: reggae music. The theme for Reggae Night was a celebration of the Jamaican culture; the ambience itself was rich with the country’s colors and patterns in addition to special dishes from the Caribbean island.
    When asked about the special Jamaican dishes made for this event, Toni-Ann Ross (senior, spanish for translation) said, “I made veggie fish fritters and veggie mannish water, a special dish made for gatherings.”
    Ross cooked most of the dishes for the night with the aid of a few of her friends, including Caribbean Club president Sabrina Samuel (senior, elementary education). Ross and Samuel were the two forces behind reviving the Caribbean Club and bringing Reggae Night to campus.
    Samuel said, “One day (Ross and I) met at the cafeteria and we noticed that nothing was happening to the Caribbean Club. The day after she met me at my apartment and we started planning and preparing for future events.”
    Samuel continued, “We are going to try to have events with all the different Caribbean islands bringing them together so people can see the different cultures of the Caribbean—like the different types of food, music, all these different types of stuff.”
    Concerning the preparation involved to hosting Reggae Night, Samuel said, “Toni-Ann and I started brainstorming and thought we should have a Jamaican-themed night first and that is how we had Reggae Night. I made a list of all the different foods, drinks, games.”
    Adding to the intended Caribbean atmosphere, Reggae Night was filled with different genres of Caribbean music, played by Torian Hill (junior, psychology, pre-med) and the local band The Three Trinnies and a Frenchman, starring Shawn Gurley, Carlon Nyack (Master of Divinity), Joffre St. Hilaire (Master of Divinity), Aymeric Saint-Louis-Gabriel (Master of Divinity) and Huck Baptist (Master of Divinity). When asked how long the band had been together, St. Hilaire admitted that they had only been together for “about an hour.”
    Hill started out the night with smooth reggae music to grab the attention of the audience transitioning into old reggae with new school, then finishing off the night with Dancehall.
    When asked about his previous disc jockeying experience, Hill said, “I have been a DJ for about two years, but just know a lot about music because of my culture. I have not had too many gigs. This is just something I enjoy doing because I am a musician.”
    Overall, those in attendance responded well to Reggae Night and the way that it celebrated cultures that are an integral part of the Andrews University community.
    Jeriah Richardson (junior, documentary film) said, “Reggae Night was probably the best Caribbean Club event I’ve been to.”

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